Daniel and I share an Evernote account, allowing us to easily see each others’ research and work process.  We use it for non-creative notes: to-do lists, notes on fabric pricing, the cat sitter’s contact info, evolving business documents that don’t need to be in excel, and so forth.

As we were driving down to Mass last night and listening to a podcast, the subject of tagging came up. “What’s tagging exactly?” Daniel asked.  I explained the history as I understood it, back to del.icio.us, the first implementation I’d ever seen back in 2004 or so.

So I’ve been “tagging” little bits of my digital life for over ten years, in an intentionally non-structured way. I’m cautious about thinking being restricted by technology, and so the default is paper and pen.

There have been two Evernote documents we’ve found this week that reinforced, really, how truly long a year is.  The first I found was on paper- it had been printed and I estimate was circa February 2015. Titled Systems To Improve At Brook There, it had a list of about fifteen items, from production to fabric handling to distribution that we needed to fix.  At that time, we had no idea how we’d fix any of them, and I read through the list with glee realizing we had solved MOST of them.

So, there was an unattributed quote that Tim Ferris mentioned in that podcast that we were listening to:  the way he remembered it was “we overestimate what we can do in a week and underestimate what we can do in a year.”

Daniel paused the podcast: That is exactly how we feel. It’s inspiring to realize how long a year is.

The actual quote appears to be from Bill Gates, and it’s, “Most people overestimate what they can do in one year and underestimate what they can do in ten years.”

 

2015-08-25 22.06.57

Posted by:brook delorme

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